August 11, 2009

Audigy Out

After two days of troubleshooting I had little left to try. So I've removed the Audigy sound card from my box and switched to the on-board sound which is working flawlessly now.
Yay for Linux goodness.

Now to get back to life. ;)

Posted by Muddy at 01:49 AM | Comments (0)

August 09, 2009

Ubuntu it is

Thank you Gentoo for the lessons you have taught me.
That having the ultimate distro for tweaking and customizing is a lot less appealing when you do not have multiple hours or even days to commit to upgrading one package.
That updating one package can break a system harder than a jawbreaker is to chew.

Thank you Ubuntu for showing me that Linux can be fun again.
Conky rocks, having nfs, printing and many other minor things working is so, so nice.

Now to figure out how to move my mythtv box to Mythbuntu.

Posted by Muddy at 11:15 AM | Comments (0)

January 16, 2007

Gentoo Linux Raid5, Arrrhhh!!

Day two, trying to get this horrid raid5 setup on the server.
(mind you I've done multiple raid1 setups on this and other boxes no problem)

I don't think it's the kernel, the dmesg shows the sil3114 card detected and each of the seagate sata drives detected just fine.
I've run zerofill on all four drives to be sure they are clean, ran each one through cfdisk and made one 80g partition of linux raid (fd) on each drive.

I have run the mdadm create raid command 4x now and each time it's solid, persistent superblock and clean after it's done building the array.
I even mounted it under /temp the first time and copied 132G of data from two volume groups with no issues.

That was however until I rebooted.

Then it fell apart, four times now and for two days straight. I made the array, create the reiserfs file system and mount it, no problems.

I'm going to fix the garage door opener now, I need a break or I'm going to run screaming down the street buck naked, and NOBODY wants to see that.

Currently building, I'll post output after it's done.


Every 1.0s: cat /proc/mdstat Tue Jan 16 15:35:27 2007

Personalities : [linear] [raid0] [raid1] [raid6] [raid5] [raid4] [multipath]
md2 : active raid5 sdd1[4] sdc1[2] sdb1[1] sda1[0]
234444288 blocks level 5, 64k chunk, algorithm 2 [4/3] [UUU_]
[=======>.............] recovery = 38.9% (30406512/78148096) finish=64.0min speed=12428K/sec

md1 : active raid1 hdc1[1] hdb1[0]
30018112 blocks [2/2] [UU]

md0 : active raid1 hdg1[1] hde1[0]
117218176 blocks [2/2] [UU]

unused devices:

Posted by Muddy at 03:10 PM | Comments (0)

July 27, 2006

Linux File Renaming Made Easy

I've been searching for a way to do mass file renaming in linux for a long time. I happened upon this sweet perl script and had to make everyone I can aware of it.

This script is sweet, also works in mac osx and winders.

Get it Here -> namefix.pl 3.0

Posted by Muddy at 03:43 PM | Comments (3)

July 15, 2006

Evolution: You continue to baffle me

So here I am, day, uh, oh crap I've lost count already.

Trying to emerge evolution 2.6.2 up from 2.4.2 which worked fine exept the spell check NEVER worked.
So the normal person thinks, heck I'll emerge aspell and some other libs, then the newest stable evolution and bam, however my crap never, ever is that simple.

I did aspell, and some other smaller libs that it needed, then found the ASpellFox plugin for Firefox which is fantastic I must say.

Then on to emerging evolution, which fails to

cd .. \
&& CONFIG_FILES=po/Makefile.in CONFIG_HEADERS= CONFIG_LINKS= \
/bin/sh ./config.status
config.status: creating po/Makefile.in
config.status: executing depfiles commands
config.status: executing default-1 commands
config.status: executing default-2 commands
make[2]: Leaving directory `/var/tmp/portage/evolution-2.6.2-r1/work/evolution-2.6.2/po'
make[2]: Entering directory `/var/tmp/portage/evolution-2.6.2-r1/work/evolution-2.6.2/po'
cd .. \
&& CONFIG_FILES=po/Makefile.in CONFIG_HEADERS= CONFIG_LINKS= \
/bin/sh ./config.status
config.status: creating po/Makefile.in
config.status: executing depfiles commands
config.status: executing default-1 commands
config.status: executing default-2 commands
make[2]: *** No rule to make target `@ALL_LINGUAS@.po', needed by `@ALL_LINGUAS@.gmo'. Stop.
make[2]: Leaving directory `/var/tmp/portage/evolution-2.6.2-r1/work/evolution-2.6.2/po'
make[1]: *** [all-recursive] Error 1
make[1]: Leaving directory `/var/tmp/portage/evolution-2.6.2-r1/work/evolution-2.6.2'
make: *** [all] Error 2

!!! ERROR: mail-client/evolution-2.6.2-r1 failed.
!!! Function gnome2_src_compile, Line 64, Exitcode 2
!!! compile failure
!!! If you need support, post the topmost build error, NOT this status message.

Every single time.
Even tried to go back to the older 2.4.x version and same, exact, thing.
So I emerged Thunderbird to tide me over till I get this figured out.
If anyone has any ideas I'd be in your debt if this gets figured out.

Posted by Muddy at 02:25 PM | Comments (4)

September 20, 2005

Open Souce Multimedia and Gaming / GPX2

Oh yea baby, Linux now powers a sweet handheld multimedia device. (AND it plays Ogg!, w00t!)
Maybe this is what I've been needing, sounds very interesting. Running on 2x AA batteries, plays back approx eight hours of video or fourteen hours of audio, does open source gaming as well.

Sweet.

Check it out at GPX2

Posted by Muddy at 03:49 PM | Comments (0)

August 09, 2005

MPlayer Crisis

Open Source Brothers and Sisters, our beloved MPlayer is in need of our support.
Please head over to their site and see what you can do to help.
(besides spread the love of open source) :-)

Full Story @ MPlayer

Posted by Muddy at 08:38 AM | Comments (0)

October 25, 2004

Red Hat warns of security patch hoax for Linux users

Linux vendor Red Hat Inc. is warning customers about an e-mail hoax that urges them to download security patches that actually contain malicious payloads.

In a note to customers on its Web site, Red Hat said it "has been made aware that e-mails are circulating that pretend to come from the Red Hat Security Team. These e-mails tell users to download and install malicious updates. These Trojan updates contain malicious code designed to compromise the systems they are run on."

Full Story @ Computerworld

Posted by Muddy at 12:42 PM | Comments (1) | TrackBack

August 29, 2004

check your netstat log!!

Ok, I had a big scare today.
It seems my bit torrent days may be numbered.. I found someone had leached onto my box through one of my open ports for BT.
I could not shake them, what's worse they somehow were in as root!!
I lost it man. Put their ip addy in my deny list and rebooted, they are gone now but it's a little reminder how fragile network security is.

Linux users can run command as follows..

netstat -N-e

Some dude in the UK using Demon.net on a DSL line it seems.

btw... bit torrent tracker will be down until I lock this down better.

Posted by Muddy at 02:11 AM | Comments (2) | TrackBack

June 22, 2004

Someone Has To Much Time...

Okay, I'm looking for some software on freshmeat and I noticed this neat little script that one can put on a website. I went to the demonstration site and the script told me just how evil I am.
Anyways the program is Evil Finder and it proves that linux really does have everything.

Posted by Skywalker at 09:22 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

May 23, 2004

XMLTV is Broke Again

It seems my mythtv is not updating the shows anymore. Did some digging and found zap2it changed their site, again. Xmltv is no longer supporting the old grabber but a new tv_grab_na_dd grabber I have not yet tried. Since I'm running gentoo and use the emerge system I'll update once I have it working and what I had to do.

Posted by Muddy at 11:40 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

May 06, 2004

Linux in action: A public library's success story

Over the past year, the Howard County (Md.) Public Library has migrated more than 200 public PCs from Windows 98 and Windows NT to Linux. These PCs are used both to surf the Internet and to access the library's catalogues. NewsForge recently spoke with Brian Auger, associate director of the library, and the IT team responsible for the migration. We wanted to learn more about why and how it was accomplished, and how pleased they are with the results.

Full Story @ NewsForge

Posted by Muddy at 10:21 AM | Comments (1) | TrackBack

December 06, 2003

Judge orders SCO to show Linux infringement

Full Story @ CNET News.com

IBM won a tactical victory Friday in a legal battle with SCO Group when a judge ordered SCO to show within 30 days the Linux software to which it believes it has rights and to point out where it believes IBM is infringing.

But SCO also said it will open a new copyright infringement claim in its legal attack.

In a hearing in Salt Lake City, Federal Judge Dale A. Kimball required SCO to produce two key batches of information IBM had sought in the case.

In one batch, called Interrogatory No. 12, IBM sought "all source code and other material in Linux...to which plaintiff (SCO) has rights; and the nature of plaintiff's rights." In the second, Interrogatory No. 13,

Big Blue sought a detailed description of how SCO believes IBM has infringed SCO's rights and whether SCO ever distributed the source code described in Interrogatory No. 12.

The information IBM sought is at the heart of the case, a bold lawsuit SCO began in March that alleges IBM moved technology from Unix to Linux against the terms of its contract with SCO, violating trade secrets in the process. SCO is seeking $3 billion from Big Blue, and is also trying to compel Linux-using corporations to license SCO's Unix. The judge's decision is one of the first moves in a case that will affect not just IBM but also other computing giants including Oracle, Hewlett-Packard, SAP and Dell that have embraced Linux.

IBM in August countersued with four patent violation claims and a defense that charges SCO with violating the terms of the General Public License (GPL) that governs Linux.

In the spring, when SCO first said Unix code had been copied into Linux, Chief Executive Darl McBride told CNET News.com, "We will be happy to show the evidence we have at the appropriate time in a court setting," but thus far the company hasn't done so.

*Muddy's Notes* LOL this is by far the best part of this. "SCO and IBM have each filed several motions to try to compel the other side to release information. In a motion Wednesday, IBM criticized SCO for delivering source code to IBM that had been printed on 1 million sheets of paper."

Now if you can't figure out that SCO's claim is nothing more than smoke and mirrors your numb to the world. If SCO had proof they would be very happy to have delivered it so IBM would pay up. Only someone who is bluffing stalls and then ... stalls some more. Let's get real here, every time I hear SCO open it's mouth all I hear is Wolf!

Posted by Muddy at 09:20 PM | Comments (1) | TrackBack

November 02, 2003

Checkinstall, get it, use it, love it.

It seems I've been neglecting my fellow Linux users by not posting the useful things I find. I hope to make up for some lost time this week. :-)

First I would strongly suggest you get Checkinstall.

What is Checkinstall you ask? Well it's the next best thing to MPlayer afaic.

If your like me and you prefer to download tarballs and configure, make, make install your own proggies this allows you a way out. After you have configured to meet your needs and ran make, you run checkinstall instead of make install. What checkinstall does is create a package from the source so you can uninstall or re-install at a later date.

Here is the nice part.

Please choose the packaging method you want to use.
Slackware [S], RPM [R] or Debian [D]? R

It does not matter if you run Slack, Debian or any other Linux package [except Gentoo] it will work on about anything.

Posted by Muddy at 07:43 AM | Comments (2) | TrackBack

Lindows working on Web-authoring tool

From CNET News.com

Lindows, a software company whose offerings include a version of the open-source Linux operating system intended to appeal to nontechnical users, announced this week that it is developing an open-source Web-authoring tool. In a notice posted on the Lindows Web site, CEO Michael Robertson says the Nvu project is aimed at creating a collection of Web tools comparable to Microsoft's FrontPage and Macromedia's Dreamweaver.

Robertson said Nvu will use some of the code for Mozilla Composer, the authoring element of the open-source Web browser. He expects Nvu to be ready next year.

Posted by Muddy at 12:25 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

October 27, 2003

An open letter to Bill Gates and Steve Ballmer

From the Inquirer

*Muddy's Note* This was Far to good to pass up on posting. Those familier with Linux/Open Source will enjoy this.
*end note*

Messrs William Gates Jnr & Steven Ballmer
Microsoft Corporation
One Microsoft Way
Redmond
Washington, USA

Dear Sirs

I see you have been active again in making interesting and to some degree highly amusing statements about Free/Libre Open Source Software and the many and varied people who make up its community.

I in particular would like to thank Mr. Steven Ballmer for your entertaining exposee of Linux's deepest, darkest secret - that it can seriously worry the senior executive of a convicted predatory monopoly, without that ever having been the intention of its principal software designer and initial developer.

I would also like to thank you for humming and hawing around the question of the release of source code to people who can use it, in the light of the new MVP source code entitlement program. Well, are they deserving members of the Windows development team or not?

In relation to your comments, Steve Ballmer, on Linux's "road map", I will refrain from expounding on Linus Torvalds' comment on the cover of one of Bill Gates' books, showing him standing in the middle of an empty road. It's not nice to make jokes like that, is it, Your Billness? Road kill is no joke, even if some enterprising chef has written a book about it.

No, I have something else on my mind, something much more worthy.

I would like to challenge you to a software coding bake-out, a bet to see which methodology works, and which doesn't. You have made some progress with your NT source tree, anyone can see that - Windows 2k3 is a more serious product than Windows XP, and definitely a more realistic - and much more massive - product than Windows 95. Congratulations.

You have also declared that Windows 95, Windows NT 3.x and NT 4.x are discontinued, end-of-line, unsupported products. And Windows 98 is shortly going to be in the same category, having already been discontinued. And Microsoft is attempting to roll the Win9x features into the NT line. XP is the nearest you have come to success. In the process, Windows users have enjoyed an interesting remote use of RPC and other features that might otherwise bug you. And in the process you have put back Longhorn's release date.

My challenge is this - release the entire range of discontinued, end-of-line and unsupported Operating Systems mentioned above (Win9x, NT 3.x and Win4.x) and their related utilities and Productivity Applications, as Open Source under the BSD/MIT license, since you have stated at sundry times and in diverse manners that that license is one you can live with. You are of course expected to sanitise the source trees - we don't want trouble with absurd IP cases.

Release the sanitised source trees, minus any bits and pieces of third-party encumbered code Microsoft may have in the Win9x and NT 3.x and 4.x source trees, to the ftp servers at the MIT, ibiblio, the U of Calif. at Berkeley, and the U of Cambridge, UK, with prominent notices stating that they are released under the terms of the BSD/MIT licenses placed in slashdot.org, newsforge.com, computerworld.com, news.com.com, www.theinquirer.net and www.theregister.co.uk and other industry news outlets.

My bet is that in the time it takes Microsoft to come up with a half-way decent Windows product, the Open Source development process starting from an earlier, identical initial source tree without constraints will produce one better. The length of time is going to be the same.

On one side you have the multi-billion dollar transnational corporation, on the other you have an amorphous world-wide community. One has a head start, but the code bases for this challenge are the same.

The only catch - Microsoft is not allowed to use the source code produced by the open source effort until after it has rolled out Longhorn - thus preserving the independence of the challengers, who will not have access to the Longhorn source tree. After the challenge has finished and the bets have been tallied up, then it is a totally different story, because the BSD/MIT license doesn't prohibit incorporation within a closed-source code base, only the denial of attribution. But should Microsoft use the independent effort's code during such a challenge, it would be an admission that the Free/Libre Open Source community is right, and must be met with an appropriate forfeit - the sanitising and opening of the Longhorn source tree.

I propose in the interim that the challenge in the interim be named something other than Windows or Office - precisely what will have to be decided upon later.

So, there you have it. Are either of you betting men, able to face a challenge?

Yours Sincerely

Wesley Parish

Posted by Muddy at 05:18 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Beware Mandy's 9.2 Release

From Mandrake Linux 9.2 - Errata

It seems Mandrake's new 9.2 release is causing some LG based CD-ROM drives to crash and burn. The following announcement is from Mandrake's website.

"Error scenario: Installing 9.2 and being told unable to install the base system and subsequent reboot reveals that CD-ROM drive is physically dead.
Why: According to LG Electronics, their ODD (Optical Disc Drive) products do not support Linux nor do they test with Linux. Unfortunately, many Dell computers (possibly others) come with these CD-ROM drives.
Solution: Currently there is no solution or work-around for this issue; it is still under investigation. Damage occurs even when doing a network install. At this point, please do not install Mandrake Linux 9.2 on any computer containing a LG-based CD-ROM drive or it will damage your CD-ROM drive! We are actively looking for a solution to this problem."

Posted by Muddy at 05:10 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

October 18, 2003

Linux. The Future Is Open.

From IBM.com

60x60_prodigy.jpg
Linux is like nothing else in the history of computing—the most unique innovation operating systems have ever seen. It's unprecedented integration. It's an open source operating system. Owned by no single company or private enterprise. Constantly improved by thousands of programmers. And it's getting bigger. Last year, according to the IDC, shipments of servers running Linux increased by 22.8%.

If Linux were a person, he would be growing, fast. Taught by the best. Gaining wisdom beyond his years. And sharing. He would be in business, education, government and homes. He would be a nine-year-old boy changing the world.

Download the Ad Here. (Mpeg format 8.31Mb)

*Muddy's Note* This is a great commercial, even if you don't get into Linux.

Posted by Muddy at 07:06 AM | Comments (1) | TrackBack

October 07, 2003

New Screenshot

Well, finally getting around to playing some more with Karamba, now have T-Mon, Liquid-Weather and Kroller running.

Kroller seems easy enough to edit, swapped out the mozilla icon for Phoenix/Firebird since I'm running it now.

As before they can all be found on KDE-Look.org

Posted by Muddy at 04:51 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

October 03, 2003

Karamba is very cool

I was messing around with SuperKaramba today and thought I'd put up a quick shot of what it does. It's a very cool program that allows you to run themes and change your linux box into anything you want.
I'm going to add the Mac OSX scroll bar next, but now I have to get some sleep.
I'll report on more as I play around with it.

You can check out the themes and such @ KDE-Look.org

Posted by Muddy at 03:35 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

October 01, 2003

Upgraded to MythTV v0.11 finally

Well I got off my butt and I'm upgrading my MythTV to v0.11 today.
Finished upgrading xmltv to 0.5.15 with no problems. I did have to download the DateManip-5.42 perl module from CPAN.org website.

MythTV is still compiling, I'll update when I'm done. I'm also going to put up all the files in one spot so anyone else with Mandrake 9.1 can just grab the files from here to make life easy.

Posted by Muddy at 11:50 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

September 16, 2003

Microsoft blow as Ford signs up for Linux

From Scotsman.com

FORD is joining the ranks of governments and local authorities across the world that have switched from Microsoft software to the free open-source alternative Linux.

The car giant will run its sales operations, human resources, customer relations management and the rest of its infrastructure operations on the upstart technology.

Until now, defectors to Linux have largely been national governments such as China and local authorities in countries like Germany concerned that Microsoft’s Windows operating systems represented a security risk by not allowing them to inspect the source code, the systems’ software foundations, for weaknesses.

But government is a small part of Microsoft’s custom and it is its almost total domination of the business market that has made it the world’s leading software company. That makes Ford’s defection to Linux the biggest potential threat to Microsoft in the software developer’s 28-year history.

Business software applications can now run as easily on Linux as on Microsoft’s Windows operating systems.

Posted by Muddy at 02:37 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

September 13, 2003

Open source: A nonproprietary world

From CNET News.com

Open-source software has underlying source code--the instructions that programmers write--that may be freely seen, changed and redistributed. This contrasts sharply with proprietary software from companies such as Microsoft or Oracle, which typically control source code privileges tightly.

The best-known open-source project is Linux, a Unix-like operating system, begun by Linus Torvalds and now embraced by most of the world's top computing companies.

Businesses have a handful of reasons to look to open-source software. It's free to try out and can be lower-cost to use, although products often aren't as full-featured. And open-source software presents an alternative to customers that fear buying proprietary software will lock them into a relationship with the company that sold it.

The open-source movement is an offshoot of the work of Richard Stallman, whose Gnu's Not Unix (GNU) project to clone Unix introduced the General Public License (GPL) that provides a legal framework governing many open-source projects. GNU also provided many important tools that the best-known open-source project, Linux, used and built upon.

Boosted by companies such as Red Hat and SuSE Linux, Linux began spreading across the computing world in the late 1990s, putting pressure both on Microsoft and on Unix vendors. IBM in particular put its considerable muscle behind Linux, bringing it even to its vaunted mainframe server line; market researcher IDC says $2 billion worth of Linux servers were sold in 2002.

While Linux is popular on servers--powerful networked computers that handle round-the-clock data processing and storage tasks--it's not widely used on desktop machines. It's considered too technically difficult by most observers, although Linux backers have begun pushing it for corporate desktop computers used only for a limited range of tasks.

One Linux software company, originally named Caldera and now called SCO Group, failed to make a business of Linux. It acquired much of the Unix intellectual property in 2001 in an attempt to expand its business, but when that didn't work out either, it began a new strategy to profit from that Unix intellectual property. After hiring high-profile attorney David Boies, SCO began arguing that Unix source code and extensions are illegally used in Linux. Its opening salvo in March was ambitious: a lawsuit against IBM alleging that Big Blue violated its Unix contracts with SCO when it moved its own Unix extensions to Linux. Now SCO has begun asking all Linux users to pay it hundreds of dollars each.

SCO's actions haven't been received warmly. IBM countersued SCO in August, bringing four patent infringement claims as well as a vigorous defense of the GPL, and Red Hat sued SCO the same week in an attempt to lay the matter to rest as quickly as possible. Linux advocates have scoffed at SCO's charges, industry analysts have questioned the merits of their arguments, and intellectual property attorneys have advised companies to wait for legal ruling before agreeing to SCO's demands.

Meanwhile, the open-source world moves on. While volunteers and hobbyists are widespread, more mature projects such as Linux often are run by programmers paid for their work. Among other important open-source projects are Apache, which is used to host Web sites; OpenOffice, a competitor to Microsoft Office; MySQL, a database program; Sendmail, server software for delivering e-mail; and FreeBSD, a Unix derivative used in Apple's Mac OS X.

Posted by Muddy at 11:29 PM | Comments (7) | TrackBack

September 03, 2003

IBM, Linux to Power Library of Congress Archive

From atnewyork.com

With Linux finding its way into larger slices of mainstream America, it makes sense that the open source operating system has also found favor among a swath of scholarly pursuits.

IBM Wednesday aired its latest Linux-oriented win when it announced that the University of Washington, Rutgers Universities Libraries, and the Georgia Institute of Technology Interactive Media Technology Center have opted to run Linux on Power4 chip architecture to build an online catalog of film, television and digital video for the Library of Congress.

The $900,000 catalog, called the Moving Images Collections Portal Project (MIC), will house roughly 80,000 images from libraries, national archives, museums and broadcasting companies all over the world. The MIC will work like an Internet search engine, albeit modified to find only moving images, where users can find what they need with just a browser.

Standout footage includes archives in the national Smithsonian and video from the Hubble telescope, as well as footages from filmed natural disasters and the terrorist attacks from 9/11 nearly two years ago.

The universities feel MIC will be a big help to those searching for visual footage -- from scientists to researchers, authors, educators, students and the general public -- because of the sheer size of the online catalog.

The University of Washington and Rutgers University will use IBM eServer pSeries systems running Linux to develop the directory and catalog databases of digital images. Georgia Institute of Technology will use the pSeries machines to create the Web portal where users will access the Internet from their browsers.

The MIC databases and Web portal will be powered by two IBM eServer p630 servers, which start at $13,720 and two p610 machines, which cost $6,829, running SuSE Linux Enterprise SLES 8 and IBM's directory server. When users pin down the video they need, they can contact the content providers to obtain permission to view or reference the images.

The news demonstrates two distinct points: that there is money to be made from Linux and that digital, Internet-based footage is becoming increasingly common the world over. A $900,000 grant was given to the universities from the National Science Foundation to pay for the lengthy project.

The Library of Congress will host the MIC, after it is completed in 2004 and the Association of Moving Image Archivists (AMIA) will influence its growth and design.

For IBM, the contract is still an indication of the blooming popularity of Linux as an alternative to proprietary systems such as Unix or Microsoft Windows. It also cements the company's status as a leading provider of Linux products.

The University of Washington said it chose Linux on IBM servers because it could be custom coded and could adjust to the requirements of the MIC project.

Other systems vendors doubling as Linux enthusiasts such as HP and Dell have been angling for such big contracts, but IBM, with its multi-billion-dollar Linux push, is leading the pack.

Posted by Muddy at 06:22 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

September 02, 2003

SCO to send out Linux invoices

From BusinessWeek Online

The SCO Group is turning up the heat in its attempt to impose Unix license fees for Linux use: It plans to begin sending invoices to companies before the month is out.

The SCO Group is turning up the heat in its attempt to impose Unix license fees for Linux use: It plans to begin sending invoices to companies before the month is out.

The Lindon, Utah-based company announced in August that it wants corporations to buy Unix licenses for using the similar Linux operating system, asking $699 for a single-processor Linux server. But Tuesday, SCO spokesman Blake Stowell said the company will begin the more active approach of sending invoices requesting payment to commercial Linux users, "probably some time this month."

Sending invoices, while a more-aggressive move, still stops short of the kind of legal action the company has threatened before. In July, SCO Chief Executive Darl McBride described the licensing program as "a solution that...gets you square with the use of Linux, without having to go to the courtroom."

SCO will pursue commercial Linux users who have discussed their Linux work publicly, Stowell said. However, it won't take action until it's done more research on those businesses, he added.

Stacey Quandt, an independent Linux analyst, said companies should wait to see how the current SCO lawsuits end before acting.

"I can't see why a company would pay this, since it is all based on allegations and hasn't been proven in court," she said.

SCO argues that Linux contains intellectual property from Unix, an operating system to which SCO holds copyrights and which it licenses to companies such as Hewlett-Packard and Sun Microsystems. SCO argues that some Linux source code was copied directly from Unix. It also claims that other Linux source code stems from improvements made to Unix by IBM and others, which then illegally moved the changes to Linux.

SCO has sued IBM for $3 billion over the issue. The move triggered a countersuit from Big Blue as well as a separate legal attack from Linux seller Red Hat. Linux advocates, meanwhile, have scoffed at SCO's intellectual property claims.

Stowell said the invoices mark an intermediate stage in SCO's efforts to get a company to pay up, before taking it to court.

"We're not planning on...suing some commercial user of Linux from the start," he said. "We'll give ample opportunities to get the license before we do that."

The companies to which SCO sends invoices are likely high on its list of candidates for lawsuits, according to Quandt.

"SCO continues to use tactics of brinkmanship, and it is certainly possible that the companies that get invoices could become future defendants," she said.

Some intellectual property attorneys have argued that businesses that take SCO's threats seriously shouldn't pay now, but rather should set money aside in the event that SCO wins in court.

Meanwhile, SCO is having setbacks in one legal case brought by German Linux advocacy group LinuxTag. In that suit, a judge decreed in June that SCO couldn't display a letter sent to 1,500 large companies, warning them that using Linux could pose legal problems.

SCO removed some sections of its Web site to comply with the judge's order. However, LinuxTag then told the court SCO was violating the order by showing its business partners a link to the letter, Stowell said. The court agreed and fined SCO 10,000 euros ($10,800)--a ruling that SCO has appealed, Stowell said.

Posted by Muddy at 06:33 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

August 31, 2003

Motorola picks Linux for phone of the future

From The Register

The fact that Motorola is selling its stake in Symbian (the corporation) doesn't mean that Motorola is stopping selling Symbian (the software) in its phones.

But it does mean that Motorola thinks the future in phone software is elsewhere. Linux, to be precise.

The company will be carrying on with its licensing of Symbian, with a Symbian-based 3G phone, the A920, shipping in the next weeks into the UK. But the Chinese Government's focus is on Linux, and they expect to see Linux as the operating system in everything.

Not only is China potentially, the world's largest mobile phone market, but it's also where most phones are built.

Even more significantly, it's where the next generation of all mobile devices will be based, thinks Motorola; a small empire called Linux, China will rule the world.

Back in July, the "Open PDA" was announced as a joint venture, by Motorola and Metrowerks - a software tool maker which Motorola owns - for the i.MX1 microprocessor. Open PDA is a development solution based on Linux, "for the creation of next generation wireless devices".

"The platform and silicon combine to help developers significantly shorten design cycles and speed time to market," Motorola said at the time, failing to mention the low royalty fees involved.

"The OpenPDA Development Studio for the Motorola i.MX1 eliminates the need for manual integration of the kernel, device drivers, applications and middleware required for the creation of wireless devices," said the July announcement.

The processor is yet another ARM derivative, already a player in the PDA market. But if the partnership with the Chinese Government takes off, the OpenPDA could take over from both PocketPC and Palm.

Right now, Motorola is sticking to the one universal platform - Java - which runs on all existing phones and PDAs, whatever OS - and that's the angle the corporate publicity spin suggests. It's true: in February, Motorola announced its first Linux-powered handset, which uses Java technology. It has done a deal with Microsoft, though no phone has appeared yet - but when it does, it will support Java apps. And it is carrying on with the Java-supporting Symbian phone range. But what matters, is Linux.

The deal with Symbian is simple enough; Motorola owns nearly 20 per cent, and Nokia is expected to buy the majority of that, while Psion, the parent of Symbian, will buy the rest. ®

Posted by Muddy at 10:58 PM | Comments (1) | TrackBack

August 17, 2003

Global IT firm predicts Linux will have 20% desktop market share by 2008

From NewsForge

One of the world's largest IT companies is declaring that the Linux desktop will capture 20% of the market for desktop computers in large enterprises within 5 years.

Siemens Business Systems, the $6 billion global IT consulting and outsourcing company, has conducted extensive testing with real-world, non-technical workers and is declaring that Linux has matured as a desktop and will quickly vault to the #2 most-installed OS in the world.

Senior program manager Duncan McNutt, who has overseen Siemens's testing of Linux desktops with users and administrators in enterprise settings, believes that Linux will grow quickly as a desktop OS because it can deliver equal productivity at significantly lower costs than Windows in very large enterprise environments -- installations of 4,000 to 40,000 desktops.

McNutt says that when Siemens, with 33,000 employees in 44 countries, initially evaluated Linux as a productivity desktop, it saw little utility outside of technical departments. "We didn't see Linux on the desktop as a major market, but we were wrong."

However, McNutt, interviewed by phone from Frankfurt, says Siemens has been prodded to investigate the viability of Linux on the desktop by customers who are both impressed by the success of Linux servers and annoyed by Microsoft's pricing and licensing policies.

The stakes are high, says McNutt: even a single day of productivity lost to technology issues like version upgrades, multiplied by 10,000 or more workers, quickly shows up on enterprise customers' balance sheets, and that's very bad news for the CIO. So, while lower IT costs are "very important" to large customers, maintaining productivity is even more critical.

That's why testing was conducted with "secretaries and managers, not IT people." McNutt believes that the Ximian desktop and application suite, running on either SuSE or Red Hat, requires two days of training, which is the same as what most enterprises budget for a Windows/MS Office version upgrade: one day to acquaint users with the desktop, and one day to introduce the OpenOffice suite.

McNutt went on to say that Ximian's suite -- consisting of a Gnome-based Linux desktop, Evolution mail and calendar app, a tweaked OpenOffice suite, and Red Carpet admin tools -- can be deployed in very large enterprises at lower cost and with no greater disruption than a Windows upgrade, and with significant savings going forward. McNutt says that Linux will save 20% to 30% in administration costs, 50% in hardware costs, and 80% in licensing fees.

Siemens has no "religious" attachment to a particular distro or desktop environment. Before settling on Ximian, Siemens evaluated plain vanilla Gnome and KDE as well. Siemens found KDE to be more "Windows-like" than Gnome, but that led to problems when non-technical users expected a more Windows-like experience. Gnome, particularly Ximian's version, was "different enough" to set user expectations that the experience would be less like Windows, which led to fewer adoption problems.

McNutt also believes that there is kind of virtuous cycle developing, where firms like Siemens and Novell are working with Open Source-oriented companies like Ximian (recently acquired by Novell) to swat bugs and develop features which ultimately go back to the Open Source community. That large group then improves and further debugs the corporate contributions, leading to a code base that rapidly becomes more useful, refined, and stable in corporate environments.

McNutt says that Linux reduces administration costs in large installations of 1,000 desktops and up because it is more scriptable and well-documented than Windows. "With Windows, there's always some feature that you can only get to through the GUI," he says. He also cites the better documentation in Linux that allows administrators to solve oddball problems that can be very time-consuming on Windows, where parts of the proprietary OS are undocumented. McNutt feels that Linux is particularly strong in remote management, which is becoming more important as enterprise workers become more widely dispersed.

Linux saves money on hardware because it typically requires fewer resources to start with, and also because "feature bloat" from application upgrades don't tend to result in machines that run unacceptably slowly after two years service. "If you can keep a machine running at acceptable levels of performance for three years rather than two, you've just saved 50% on hardware costs," McNutt says.

McNutt says that while Linux will save 80% over Microsoft's licensing fees, many large customers, particularly large European government offices, are even more unhappy about being in a position where Microsoft can dictate terms to them. He noted reports that even the U.S. Department of Defense and the State of Washington, Microsoft's home ground, are looking at Linux as an alternative as well.

"These government installations are huge -- often 30,000 or 40,000 desktops" says McNutt. The Europeans are miffed that Microsoft's new licensing leaves them unable to afford both upgrades and support on their current budgets, and, in any case, would much rather use their IT spending to help encourage a local tech industry rather than support a U.S. monopoly.

McNutt noted that some German city governments have already begun to install Linux desktops, and that his firm is about to roll out 7,000 Linux desktops at a "very large financial institution." If that program succeeds, McNutt expects to convert the remaining 27,000 seats to Linux as well.

He also says that large numbers of enterprises that have already delayed or skipped Windows upgrades to save money during difficult economic times are coming to a point that they will have to upgrade to maintain productivity levels. These companies will be looking closely at the experiences of the first large enterprises to embrace Linux on the desktop.

Posted by Muddy at 11:42 PM | Comments (1) | TrackBack

March 28, 2003

MythTV working again

Ok, after giving up on MythTV for some time I gave it another shot last night, and it's working again.
Thanks to the new release of both MythTV and XMLTV. I've uploaded both files that I used on my Mandrake 9 system.
Mythtv-0.8 and XMLtv-0.5.8

Remember in North America you'll have to run mythfilldatabase --manual and hand set all your stations the first time. I did not have any luck with the --xawchannels option.

*note* even on my machine (Athlon 945mhz) compiling mythtv took about an hour or so.

Posted by Muddy at 12:46 PM | Comments (2) | TrackBack

March 26, 2003

KDE News Ticker

I was attempting to add FoxNews to my KDE News Ticker and was finding it a challenge finding news feeds to add. So I stumbled across theSyndic8.com web site.

It's a wealth of news feeds of about every subject you can image. I even added a Steelers news feed so I can keep up with the team news.

Adding them to KDE was simple as well. I also found getting the icon added was very simple, simply put in the site URL www.site name.com then add /favicon.ico
That will use the sites favicon as the image displayed in the news ticker.

Posted by Muddy at 03:54 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

March 23, 2003

American Soldiers Allegedly Taken Prisoner

Al-Jazeera and Iraqi television have been showing a video with 5 alleged American prisoners of war. All appear to have been beaten, and were being interrogated by the media. The video also show several bodies of what appears to be American soldiers - all of the soldiers seem to have been shot execution style in the head accoording to people have viewed the video.

All of this would be a violation of the Geneva Convention.

The Pentagon says it does know of unaccounted for soldiers in the field, but knows of none taken prisoner. They say they do look to be consistent with US Soldiers - however the video is edited and is also consistent with Iraqi propaganda.

There is also the possibility that the video dates to Gulf War I.

This is consistent with the Hussein Regime and as one Marine put it to Colonel North yesterday "What kind of son of a b---- burns his own country?"

Posted by at 11:14 AM | Comments (1) | TrackBack

March 19, 2003

France May Join War Effort

France May Join War Effort
Politics: 19 March 2003, Wednesday.

Despite its opposition to a war in Iraq, France could assist a U.S.-led military coalition if Iraq used biological and chemical weapons, the French ambassador to the United States told CNN on Tuesday.

"If Saddam Hussein were to use chemical and biological weapons, this would change the situation completely and immediately for the French government," Jean-David Levitte told CNN.

Levitte said a decision on any French participation in the war would be made by French President Jacques Chirac in such an event.

Story From novinite.com

Posted by Muddy at 02:24 PM | Comments (9) | TrackBack

Micro$oft Flaw Leads to Military Hack

All I have to say to these simpletons is.... switch to Open Source and you can avoid these stupid problems.

Full Story HERE

Posted by Muddy at 02:21 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

March 09, 2003

Linux On A Single Chip

Linux on a single chip, what will they think off next?

Full Story HERE

Posted by at 02:24 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Linux On A Single Chip

Linux on a single chip, what will they think off next?

Full Story HERE

Posted by Muddy at 02:24 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

February 11, 2003

XMLTV update (works with zap2it again)

XMLTV Downloads

XMLTV (used by MythTV) is patched and updated. You can downloaed it from the link above.

Posted by at 04:17 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

XMLTV update (works with zap2it again)

XMLTV Downloads

XMLTV (used by MythTV) is patched and updated. You can downloaed it from the link above.

Posted by Muddy at 04:17 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

February 10, 2003

Sun Releases Solaris 9 for Intel

"Sun has announced that it is releasing Solaris 9 for Intel. Any takers? According to Sun, it extends the 'enterprise class OS to the X86 market'. How nice of them. Non-commercial usage is available at no charge, while commercial pricing starts at US $99; attractive OEM pricing is also available. Source code for Solaris will now be available. It seems they are after Microsoft, not Linux. More Power to them."

I am buring this to CD right now! This may very well change the game for Microsoft.

Read the entire story here

Posted by at 02:45 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Sun Releases Solaris 9 for Intel

"Sun has announced that it is releasing Solaris 9 for Intel. Any takers? According to Sun, it extends the 'enterprise class OS to the X86 market'. How nice of them. Non-commercial usage is available at no charge, while commercial pricing starts at US $99; attractive OEM pricing is also available. Source code for Solaris will now be available. It seems they are after Microsoft, not Linux. More Power to them."

I am buring this to CD right now! This may very well change the game for Microsoft.

Read the entire story here

Posted by at 02:45 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

February 09, 2003

MythTV Personal Video Recorder

If you are looking for a way to record your favorite tv shows to your hard drive then MythTV is for you. (pending your using linux)

I installed it on my workstation (Mandrake 9.0, AMD Athlon 900mhz 768MB PC133, 40G IBM ATA100 7200rpm drive and ATI Tv Wonder PCI) and it's wonderful. Once you get past the challenging install that is.

The only thing missing is the ability to record to mpeg2 so I can archive the shows on CD-R.

If your going to install to Mandrake 9.0 you need to be aware you will have to link qmake as mythtv can't seem to find it.
Use ln -sw /usr/lib/qt3/bin/qmake in the /usr/bin directory.

Also the default install of perl works fine but you will need to download all kinds of perl modules. The easiest way I found was to download them from the cpan.org site. However your supposed to use "perl -MCPAN -e shell" and use the cpan network to get the files. I found this method to take a very long time when I could download 10-15 modules and install them before the cpan shell could find one.

I've tar'd the files I used (most of them anyways) and if your using mandrake 9.0 these will work... they might work on other distros as well. If they do let me know. I've uploaded what I downloaded and used to here.

Posted by at 03:23 PM | Comments (1) | TrackBack

MythTV Personal Video Recorder

If you are looking for a way to record your favorite tv shows to your hard drive then MythTV is for you. (pending your using linux)

I installed it on my workstation (Mandrake 9.0, AMD Athlon 900mhz 768MB PC133, 40G IBM ATA100 7200rpm drive and ATI Tv Wonder PCI) and it's wonderful. Once you get past the challenging install that is.

The only thing missing is the ability to record to mpeg2 so I can archive the shows on CD-R.

If your going to install to Mandrake 9.0 you need to be aware you will have to link qmake as mythtv can't seem to find it.
Use ln -sw /usr/lib/qt3/bin/qmake in the /usr/bin directory.

Also the default install of perl works fine but you will need to download all kinds of perl modules. The easiest way I found was to download them from the cpan.org site. However your supposed to use "perl -MCPAN -e shell" and use the cpan network to get the files. I found this method to take a very long time when I could download 10-15 modules and install them before the cpan shell could find one.

I've tar'd the files I used (most of them anyways) and if your using mandrake 9.0 these will work... they might work on other distros as well. If they do let me know. I've uploaded what I downloaded and used to here.

Posted by Muddy at 03:23 PM | Comments (10) | TrackBack

February 07, 2003

Group to push Linux for desktop computing

Linus Torvalds, who created Linux in 1991, called desktop Linux "inevitable."

"We already have all of the tools, in open-source software, necessary for 80% of office workers in the world: an office suite including spreadsheet, word processor, and presentation program; a Web browser, graphical desktop with file manager, and tools for communications, scheduling, and personal information management," Torvalds said in a statement.

Read the entire story here

Posted by at 02:10 AM | Comments (1) | TrackBack

Group to push Linux for desktop computing

Linus Torvalds, who created Linux in 1991, called desktop Linux "inevitable."

"We already have all of the tools, in open-source software, necessary for 80% of office workers in the world: an office suite including spreadsheet, word processor, and presentation program; a Web browser, graphical desktop with file manager, and tools for communications, scheduling, and personal information management," Torvalds said in a statement.

Read the entire story here

Posted by at 02:10 AM | Comments (1) | TrackBack

February 04, 2003

Microsoft Warns SEC of Open-Source Threat

Microsoft Corp. may in the future be forced to lower its software prices as a result of the growth of open source, the company cautioned in its latest filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Read the entire story here

They know what is coming!!!

Posted by at 12:57 AM | Comments (4) | TrackBack

Microsoft Warns SEC of Open-Source Threat

Microsoft Corp. may in the future be forced to lower its software prices as a result of the growth of open source, the company cautioned in its latest filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Read the entire story here

They know what is coming!!!

Posted by at 12:57 AM | Comments (3) | TrackBack

January 03, 2003

Lindows chief funds Xbox hack

Michael Robertson, chief executive of software company Lindows, has revealed himself as the formerly anonymous donor of $200,000 (£125,000) in prize money in a contest to translate the Linux operating system to Microsoft's Xbox video game console.

Click here to read the entire story

Posted by at 09:16 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

January 01, 2003

Giving Gentoo a shot

Well, I've come to the realization that my redhat intsall is so hacked up I need to start fresh... so I'm trying Gentoo.

After installing multiple version of the same things (not rpm'd) I'm unable to locate all the files to get rid of the rogue versions. So I'm in the process atm of installing gentoo linux. You can find out about it at the gentoo.org site. It is in essence THE distro for people serious about linux. If your giving it a shot for the first time, I'd suggest RedHat or Mandrake. The fact that Gentoo has more programs configured for their distro than the others made the difference for me. The fact that vcr, avifile, Xvid and other proggies I've been fighting with redhat to get working are compiled for Gentoo and downloadable off their site, made the difference.

I'm currently downloading the stage 3 tarball of their site and should have my fresh install up and running soon. (I hope)

I'll update here once I have it all done and working.

(1/1/2003 Edit... btw.. when downloading the stage 2 or 3 tarball... highlight the tarball and hit 'd' to download it. Don't do what i've just spent an hour doing... hitting enter and downloading the text, instead of saving it.)

Posted by Muddy at 09:59 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

November 14, 2002

Settings for Ogg Vorbis in Grip

Ok, I finally figured out how to get Grip to put all the info from the CD into the tag.
Here is the Encoder Command Line :

-o %m -a %a -l %d -t %n -b %b %w -d %y -N %t -G %G

This will put in everything but comments.
Enjoy,
Muddy

Posted by at 05:35 PM | Comments (0)

November 09, 2002

IPCop, Open Source Firewall

I have been looking for an easier way to manage my firewall/router setup at home. Currently running Linux out of the box, setup as needed. However it's too bulky for me personally and so I'm on the hunt for something a tad more dedicated. In comes IPCop.org a small, and serious open source firewall for home and SoHo use.
I downloaded their iso image, burned the cd and installed it to a spare 500Mb hard drive I had lying around... it's quick to install and very easy to use. I did have one problem... wireless. The current stable release is v0.1.1 as of today and so I'm waiting for v 0.2 which will include native wireless support. I'm very excited about this software, if you are looking for something powerful and easy to use this is a must see.

Posted by at 09:26 AM | Comments (1)

October 19, 2002

New Desktop Shot

With all the wonderful icon sets, wallpapers and such for KDE, it's hard not to change things around now and again... so here's my latest setup.

Posted by at 10:59 AM | Comments (0)